The Other Side of The Border

By Alexis Teyie, Kenya I was finally brave enough (i.e. so grieved as to convince myself I cannot possibly be further moved) to look at images from South Sudan. CAR is unpalatable, Eastern DRC I regurgitate when no one is watching. But this? It is like seeing a child you knew (a neighbour’s perhaps) grow into…

Bounty-Hunter

By Rebecca Njeri; Kenya I became a bounty-hunter when I was thirty-three years old. The first time a woman approached me with a bounty on her man, I was shell-shocked. I couldn’t wrap my mind around how her love for this man had morphed into a loathing that could only be extinguished with the vengeance…

Afrikanah

By Rebecca Njeri; Kenya The inevitable thing about being decolonized is that a part of you leaves with the colonizers, and a part of them stays with you. They market your “native” dances fueled by “primitive” energy. They market your bead work, soapstone and wood carvings. You on the other hand learn their religion, their language,…

Same Old Tricks, Just a Different Day

By Andrew Mulembe; Kenya Remember when we were kids and made fittingly childish threats when our parents’ denied us our guilty pleasures for our own good? Yes. Now, remember when our parents’ caved in to all of our requests simply because we threw such tantrums? No. Assuming you had good parents, you have absolutely no…

African Poetry Anthology

By Kristin Wilson Recently, a number of us have begun assembling works, notably poetry, written in African languages on a blog titled “The African Poetry Anthology”. In one sense this endeavour is trivial. As a molecular biologist, I recognise how many African countries are rife with demonstrations of the Red Queen hypothesis. In fact, just…